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Contents to my new book 'Living better with dementia: Good practice and innovation for the future'

 

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Please note that this may or may not be the final book cover.

My new book ‘Living better with dementia: good practice and innovation for the future’ will be published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers on July 21st 2015.

The information about the book is here.

This is the official ‘blurb’.

What do national dementia strategies, constantly evolving policy and ongoing funding difficulties mean for people living well with dementia? Adopting a broad and inclusive approach, Shibley Rahman presents a thorough critical analysis of existing dementia policy, and tackles head-on current and controversial topics at the forefront of public and political debate, such as diagnosis in primary care, access to services for marginalised groups, stigma and discrimination, integrated care, personal health budgets, personalised medicine and the use of GPS tracking. Drawing on a wealth of diverse research, and including voices from all reaches of the globe, he identifies current policy challenges for living well with dementia, and highlights pockets of innovation and good practice to inform practical solutions for living better with dementia in the future. A unique and cohesive account of where dementia care practice and policy needs to head, and why, and how this can be achieved, this is crucial reading for dementia care professionals, service commissioners, public health officials and policy makers, as well as academics and students in these fields.

I can exclusively reveal the contents as below.

Acknowledgements

I am honoured that Kate Swaffer, Chris Roberts and Beth Britton have written the Forewords to my book: you can read them here.

This is my follow-up to my book ‘Living well with dementia: the importance of the person and the environment‘.

I should like to admit that I think ‘Living well’ is the wrong term. It potentially sets people up for a fall, if they cannot achieve someone else’s external standards for wellbeing. This is wrong. An aspiration for all people to live better, I feel, instead is a reasonable one.

 

 

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