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My book ‘Frailty: from assets and deficits to resilience’ will be published in early 2018

I am pleased to announce that my book ‘Frailty: from assets and deficits to resilience’ will be published early next year. I am honoured that the two main forewords to the book will be by Prof Kenneth Rockwood and Prof Adam Gordon. Both Rockwood and Gordon have contributed excellence in research. It is not inappropriate to describe Rockwood as a world leader, whose research into frailty has ranged from mathematical modelling of deficit accumulation to social vulnerability and inequality.

For me – the discussion which must be aired generally is “What makes us healthy?”, as well as “What makes us ill?”

Unfortunately, this discussion appears to have been rather muted thus far for frailty.

“Frailty” generally describes how our bodies gradually lose their in-built reserves, leaving us less resilient and much more vulnerable to dramatic, sudden changes in health triggered by seemingly small events such as a minor infection or a change in medication or environment. Epidemiology suggests that as many as ¼ of people above the age of 80 could be classified as ‘frail’ in the UK, which means that there is a material risk of pathologising ageing. In medicine, frailty tends to refer to a group of older people who are at highest risk of adverse outcomes such as falls, infections, disability, admission to hospital, or the need for long-term care. There are important nuances in how frailty is defined, and there is a discussion now to be had whether the perception of frailty is necessarily all negative in keeping with a pathogenic medical model. This means framing the rather specialised field of frailty within health and social care with much more meticulous detail, where scientific progress is not divorced from the wider discourse of ageing. I intend that this book will be a thought-provoking original contribution to the literature, and will stimulate much needed debate by all stakeholders.

I feel a new book is desperately needed, given that a large part of care of the elderly service provision in the NHS and social care is currently being oriented towards persons living with frailty. There are virtually no books available at all in this important subject area. Conversely, there has been in recent years a huge volume of guidance from the NHS and various agencies on frailty.

The topic of frailty is not an issue of concern only for the medical profession – other professionals, practitioners and academics have important views too, as well as patients themselves self-managing the condition and carers. By fixating on all the deficits might lead to an error where insufficient attention is given to building up strengths (e.g. good bone strength, nutrition, exercise). Unpacking biases in this debate leads to a rather different view of frailty to the one we currently have.

At the current state of play, frailty is in a danger of being inadequately discussed by both health and social care of what it actually means for whole systems and ethical attitudes towards those persons who are frail. Frailty has been notoriously difficult to identify accurately, although progress has been made in relation to measuring it and also in relation to quality of life. Building up strengths is fundamental to the ‘assets based approach’ pivotal to promoting wellbeing in frailty care, and empowering people with frailty using this construct might also go some way to the stigma generated by a frailty label. This approach puts emphasis on building on what people can do (rather than cannot do), and gets out of the attitude that patients once declined are effectively put into an irreversible ‘downward spiral of decline’. In fact, I successfully argued such an approach in a previous book ‘Living well with dementia’ (CRC Press, 2014), which won “Best Book of the Year Award” for the BMJ Book Awards 2015.

There seems to me, contemporaneously, a real gap in the book market for a competitively priced book on frailty, suitable for anyone interested in this subject, which draws on cutting-edge multidisciplinary strands, which also gives due attention to political and ethical concerns. The book will address this gap, and reflect latest state of the art clinical research and service provision on frailty at the time of publication.  Furthermore, this book would mark an innovative, original contribution to the current literature in not placing the discussion so firmly placed on deficits. I wish to re-orient the narrative towards wellbeing, and the interaction between personhood and the environment, and how different approaches such as advocating human rights or co-production might see better engagement of persons who are frail with the health and care services.

Key features (for example, why is the book unique, well suited to the needs of readers?)

  • Critical evaluation and analysis of current worldwide literature on frailty.
  • Frailty framed originally in the context of salutogenesis in promoting wellbeing, whilst building on the latest biomedical evidence.
  • Will be a useful read for all professionals and practitioners wishing an introduction to the field.
  • Overview of the whole academic and practitioner field of frailty – not solely confined to a particular subject area, e.g. ‘survival analysis’ or ‘sarcopenia’.
  • Written in an easily accessible and inclusive style
  • Not simply seeing ‘frailty’ through a medical prism, i.e. focused on deficits, but a more holistic approach emphasising assets and resilience, consideration of the society, the social model of disability and sociological principles.
  • A focus heavily emphasising personhood and the environment.
  • Use of figures and tables to make reading the text enjoyable.
  • “Key points”/ “pointers”
  • Written by an experienced researcher in care of the elderly medicine with a proven record of outstanding academic books.

Table of contents

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