three books

How should care be arranged to optimise the health and wellbeing of people living with dementia and their informal carers?

The NICE guideline “Dementia: assessment, management and support for people living with dementia and their carers” currently in development will update the NICE guideline on Dementia (CG42).

The final scope is published here.

The key themes of this guidance mirror closely my new book ‘Enhancing health and wellbeing in dementia: a person-centred integrated care approach’, published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers in January 2017.

They are, as stated in the Final Scope:

1. Ethics, consent and advance decision-making
2. Training and development of health and social care staff
3. Recognition (signs and symptoms, risk factors)
4. Assessments for suspected dementia
5. Diagnosing dementia
6. Slowing the progression of dementia
7. Identifying dementia subtypes
8. Intercurrent illness in people living with dementia
9. Comorbidities and multimorbidities
10. Risk management and how it can support people living with dementia to avoid harm and maintain independence
11. Interventions to maximise the health and wellbeing of people living with dementia who experience changes in cognitive function
12. Interventions to maximise the health and wellbeing of people living
13. Assessing the needs of carers
14. Psychosocial interventions for carers of people living with dementia
15. Integrated health and social care
16. Inpatient services
17. Palliative care, pain relief and care at the end of life for people living with dementia

One of the questions asked in the final scope is, “How should care be arranged to optimise the health and wellbeing of people living with dementia and their informal carers?”  This will be the question for our 30 minute discussion in my book launch.

The presentations for my book launch will be as follows. A book signing will take place at 1 pm. Copies of Jessica Kingsley Publishers books will be available on the afternoon, including Kate Swaffer’s “What the hell happened to my brain?” (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2016). I will ensure that, if I achieve permission from the relevant parties, that items from the afternoon are published on Vimeo after the event.

1.50pm Enhancing health and wellbeing in dementia: a person-centred integrated care approach
2.10pm Co-production, human rights and citizenship
2.30pm Technology and supporting well
2.50pm Living alone at home
3.10pm Care homes and promoting wellbeing
3.50pm Preventing excess disability through psychological approaches: a clinical psychologist’s view
4.10pm Introduction to person-centred acute care in hospitals: cultural considerations
4.20pm Acute hospitals and caring well: a clinical nursing specialist’s view
4.40pm Hospices and dying well

There are fifty delegates in attendance, including myself, with a very wide range of backgrounds and experiences all relevant to the dementia field. Inevitably, I am sad in that this is my last entrance into the dementia field. I would like to say it has been a pleasure, but my views on this are well known.

I feel, notwithstanding, that I have been able to cover a huge amount of material relevant to English dementia policy, including in my previous books “Living better with dementia: good practice and innovation for the future” (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2015) and “Living well with dementia: the importance to the person and the environment” (CRC Press, 2014). I was honoured that my very first book won best book of the year award for health and social care in the BMJ Awards in 2015.

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