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Dementia health care and wellbeing: a person-centred integrated approach

I have now submitted the full manuscript for my book below. From the blurb below, it should be obvious what the book is about.

Foreword by Prof Sube Banerjee

Prof Sube Banerjee, Chair of Dementia at Brighton Centre for Dementia Studies, has confirmed that he’ll be doing the main foreword to my third book on dementia. The first two were Living well with dementia: the importance of the person and the environment (which won BMJ Best Book of the Year Award 2015)  (Rahman, 2014); and Living better with dementia: good practice and innovation for the future.

Reviews of my 2nd book

These were especially good.The main themes of my third book are as shown below.

Shibley Rahman follows his first brilliant book on dementia with this fascinating publication, containing insight and empathy in equal measure. This book will help readers – health professionals and the public alike – to understand people in their lives with dementia, guiding you through everything you ever wanted to know about dementia and could possibly want to ask. Shibley guides you through the challenges of caring for people and living with dementia. He doesn’t shy away from the topics that are uncomfortable, but he also gives space to examples of good living and practice that leave the reader with hope and positivity. –Jenni Middleton, editor, Nursing Times

I congratulate Shibley on writing a book that brings together so many of the challenges facing people who are living with dementia, their families, and professionals from many different disciplines, and takes them forward in a critically thoughtful way. This is a book that truly points the way to a future where living better is a reality for everyone affected by dementia. –Beth Britton, Freelance Campaigner, Consultant, Writer and Blogger

I commend Shibley for this valuable addition to the current thinking and discussion on what it is to live with dementia. This text builds quite significantly on his original work and continues to challenge professionals on issues of importance for families affected by dementia. I find his frank and open style refreshing, unreserved in his willingness to question both the semantics used in practice and assumptions that are too easily made on what it might be like to live with dementia. –Karen Harrison Dening, Director of Admiral Nursing, Dementia UK

This new book is an immaculately researched guide to living with dementia in England in the 21st century, covering the subject from policy to lived experience, but always with consideration and compassion. There is no better introduction to the challenges and complexities that dementia brings to individuals, families and society. (Geoff Huggins, Director of Health and Social Care Integration, Scottish Government)

This book is informative and challenging in equal measure. It not only provides a thorough analysis of the issues currently facing dementia care, but it also offers a refreshing and thoughtful critique of the many challenges. Each chapter carefully combines research evidence, practice issues and policy influences, and contextualises these within the experience of those living with dementia, including their carers.

Whilst this book is complex and thought-provoking – I believe it is a highly welcome counterbalance to current thinking on how to improve the lives of all those who are affected by dementia. It will force the reader to challenge their own thinking about dementia, not just as an illness but as a social construct, and as such I would highly recommend it.
(Rachel Thompson, Professional & Practice Development Lead for Admiral Nursing, Dementia UK)

I commend Shibley for this valuable addition to the current thinking and discussion on what it is to live with dementia. This text builds quite significantly on his original work and continues to challenge professionals on issues of importance for families affected by dementia. I find his frank and open style refreshing, unreserved in his willingness to question both the semantics used in practice and assumptions that are too easily made on what it might be like to live with dementia. (Karen Harrison Dening, Director of Admiral Nursing, Dementia UK)

Shibley Rahman follows his first brilliant book on dementia with this fascinating publication, containing insight and empathy in equal measure. This book will help readers – health professionals and the public alike – to understand people in their lives with dementia, guiding you through everything you ever wanted to know about dementia and could possibly want to ask. Shibley guides you through the challenges of caring for people and living with dementia. He doesn’t shy away from the topics that are uncomfortable, but he also gives space to examples of good living and practice that leave the reader with hope and positivity. (Jenni Middleton, editor, Nursing Times)

I congratulate Shibley on writing a book that brings together so many of the challenges facing people who are living with dementia, their families, and professionals from many different disciplines, and takes them forward in a critically thoughtful way. This is a book that truly points the way to a future where living better is a reality for everyone affected by dementia. (Beth Britton, Freelance Campaigner, Consultant, Writer and Blogger)

This is a well-written, extensively researched, easy to read and important book for anyone interested or working with dementia.
Rating: Highly recommended.
(Fenella Lemonsky, mental health service user researcher, Mental Health Today)

I would highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested or has contact with people living with dementia.
A particular strength of this book is the connection of policy to practice and practical implications. There are a number of examples where good practice can help to inform practical solutions for the future, making this a book that has value and use on many levels. A further asset is the conclusion chapter. This excellent summary draws everything together from the previous chapters under key themes and really helps to pull this book together.
I would highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested or has contact with people living with dementia; health and social care professionals, public health workers, service commissioners and researchers and students in this field. This is also a book that would be useful to members of the general public as well.
(Lynne Partington, head of research, Evaluation and Technology, The End of Life Partnership, Cheshire Nursing Times)

A unique and cohesive account of where dementia care practice and policy needs to head, and why, and how this can be achieved, this is crucial reading for dementia care professionals, service commissioners, public health officials and policy makers, as well as academics and students in these fields. (StudentNurse.net)

Title of the new third book

Dementia health, care and wellbeing: a person-centred integrated approach
Dr Shibley Rahman (with main foreword by Prof Sube Banerjee
March 20th 2017
Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Keynote

How to provide high quality care and services for people living with
dementia in residential settings and at home

Description

Every person living with dementia is entitled to the highest standards of wellbeing and health and social care services. This in-depth, evidence based book identifies how high quality care can be achieved, whether in residential or home-based settings.

Experienced dementia researcher Dr Shibley Rahman highlights the key underpinnings of integrated care that are required for wellbeing for living with dementia, including technology, staff performance, leadership, and intelligent regulation of services. The book addresses the major challenges to promoting person-centred care, and tackles difficult conversations around spirituality, sexuality and dying well. The crucial importance of promoting physical and mental health is emphasised. Taking into consideration the recent changes to the NICE guidelines for dementia, this book presents an opportunity for all those involved in the provision of care for people with dementia to maintain a focus on delivering high quality care and to engage with the wider issues surrounding wellbeing.

Points

Authoritative – the author is an extremely active and highly regarded
expert in the field.
References the recent changes to the NICE guidelines for dementia.
Practical focus on how to support the wellbeing of people with dementia in care homes and home care.

Market

Dementia care practitioners and professionals (including leads), managers, service providers and commissioners and policy makers.

The book is centred around some key themes.

gist

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